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DESTINY trial

Many people with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) need to take daily medication to control their cancer. However, this medication is unsuitable for some people and can cause serious side effects. Researchers want to find ways to improve the quality of life for people with CML who are taking these drugs.

The context

Many people with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) need to take chemotherapy drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib are all examples of TKIs. These drugs are unsuitable for some people due to the side effects they experience, and sometimes the cancer can become resistant to the medication over time. For this reason, doctors want to find ways to improve the quality of life of people taking these drugs. This study is a continuation of a large research project that has been funded by Blood Cancer UK for several years but this time involving more people to ensure the accuracy of their results.

The project

In this trial researchers want to find out whether people who are doing well on their TKI medication could achieve the same results by taking a lower drug dose, which could reduce side effects and improve their quality of life. Doctors will gradually decrease people’s dose while closely monitoring them. Then for people who continue to do well treatment may be stopped completely while doctors monitor them for another 2 years.

The aims

  • Researchers want to find out if gradually reducing TKI dose is a safe and effective treatment
  • See if people can achieve the same quality of life with a lower TKI dose