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News and blogs

20 results found.

How can I get involved in blood cancer research?

In November 2020, we asked our community to complete our survey and help us set our research priorities for the next five years.

24th Mar 2021

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Covid vaccine: should people with blood cancer get an antibody test?

Here's what we think people with blood cancer should know about antibody tests, such as how they work and what the results might mean for you.

5th Mar 2021

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From coronavirus to clinic: how did we get a vaccine?

We know a lot of people with blood cancer have questions on whether the coronavirus vaccine is safe after such a short amount of time. We hope to answer some of these questions by explaining how these vaccines have been developed.

11th Dec 2020

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The coronavirus vaccine: what you need to know

We explain what we know about the potential vaccines and what they could mean for people with blood cancer.

25th Nov 2020

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How does the coronavirus affect people with blood cancer?

We're funding vital research that will explore how different types of blood cancer might affect someone’s individual level of risk from coronavirus. This could lead to tailored advice for people with blood cancer during this pandemic.

11th Nov 2020

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New research hope for those with a rare type of leukaemia

Our research fellow, Dr Marc Mansour and his team, have come to understand more about why some types of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) stop responding to chemotherapy, and how we might overcome it in the future.

11th Jun 2020

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What causes leukaemia and how can we use this information to better treat it?

2nd Feb 2020

How does the immune system recognise and destroy Hodgkin lymphoma?

In Hodgkin lymphoma, the cells which are the root cause of the cancer are hidden within a much larger number of white blood cells. These white blood cells are usually very good at killing cancer cells, but may be unable to kill all of the Hodgkin lymphoma cells. Bloodwise Visiting Fellow Dr Zumla Cader has been investigating why...

2nd Feb 2020

Beating blood cancer: how decades of research makes us excited about the future

Last week Professor Pamela Kearns, one of the UK’s leading blood cancer researchers, gave a talk at St James’s Palace about the progress we’ve made in blood cancer research, and why we believe blood cancer can be beaten in the next few decades.

2nd Feb 2020

How did a weapon of war become a blood cancer treatment?

As we pay tribute to the soldiers of World War I, we look at the surprising link between the battlefields of France and blood cancer research.

2nd Feb 2020

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By the end of the programme, I didn’t feel despair. I felt hope.

War in the Blood, a new BBC documentary follows two people who received CAR-T therapy, a groundbreaking new treatment for blood cancer, as part of a clinical trial. Kate, our Senior Support Services Manager, reviews the documentary

8th Jul 2019

How to cope with stress: tips from Bloodwise researchers

​For Mental Health Awareness Week, two Bloodwise-funded researchers share things they do to try to maintain mental wellbeing in a stressful environment.

13th May 2019

How a virus can lead to lymphoma

Some types of lymphoma are associated with high levels of a small piece of genetic material called microRNA-155. Professor Michelle West has been investigating how a virus that causes lymphoma increases the production of this cancer-driving microRNA.

17th Jan 2019

Bloodwise research highlights 2018

It’s been a great year in blood cancer research, from CAR-T therapy to a new understanding of how leukaemia develops in children. We take a look back at some of the breakthroughs our supporters have helped to fund in 2018.

21st Dec 2018

Over half of Brits don’t know symptoms of blood cancer

31st Aug 2018

How myeloproliferative neoplasms disrupt the work of blood stem cells

Blood stem cells need to strike a delicate balance between making other types of blood cells and renewing themselves. When myeloproliferative neoplasms happen, this balance is disrupted. Recent research carried out by Bloodwise-funded researchers at the University of Cambridge has revealed the genetic changes that cause these disruptions.

14th Aug 2018

More people with CLL to benefit from ibrutinib in future

More people living with a type of leukaemia in England will soon have access to Ibrutinib, thanks to a successful campaign by Bloodwise and other organisations.

9th Aug 2018

Blood cancers taking longer to be diagnosed than other cancers

27th Jul 2018

Looking back on blood cancer research breakthroughs through the decades

4th Jul 2018

Successful stem cell transplants without chemotherapy or radiotherapy?

26th Jun 2018