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Clinical trials for childhood AML

We're here for you if you want to talk?

0808 2080 888

[email protected]

Many children in the UK who are diagnosed with cancer are treated through a clinical trial, where treatment options are compared to see which brings the best results.

Because cancer is so rare in children, clinical trials are really important for testing new treatments and improving current ones so more children are cured and long term side effects are reduced.

If there’s a clinical trial available that’s suitable for your child, your doctor may ask you, (or your child, if they’re over 15), to consider taking part. In a trial, your child’s safety and wellbeing are always the priority. They’ll be very closely monitored during and after the trial – and can withdraw at any time.

The current national clinical trial for childhood AML is called MyeChild 01. Its main aim is to find out whether adding a drug called gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction therapy leads to better outcomes.

Taking part in a trial does come with uncertainties and risks, and there’s no guarantee the treatment being tested will be better than the standard recommended treatment. If you don’t want your child to be in a trial, or there isn’t a suitable trial available, your child will be offered the best treatment available that’s appropriate for them, based on their test results and general health.

Your child’s healthcare team can give you more information about clinical trials for childhood AML. You can also find out more about clinical trials from an NHS website called Be Part of Research.