£
Donate

We're here for you if you want to talk

0808 2080 888

[email protected]

Myeloma treatment and side effects

We're here for you if you want to talk

0808 2080 888

[email protected]

Myeloma: managing the symptoms

You may also experience symptoms which are related to the disease rather than the treatment. The following drugs may be used in this situation:

  • bisphosphonates to strengthen bones and reduce any pain resulting from bone damage
  • erythropoietin (EPO) injections to treat anaemia (this will increase your red blood count and stop you feeling tired and breathless)
  • erythropoietin (EPO) injections to treat anaemia (this will increase your red blood count and stop you feeling tired and breathless)
  • granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to trigger the production of white blood cells to protect against infection
  • antibiotics to help prevent or treat infections
  • painkillers to help relieve bone pain.

Make sure your healthcare team are aware of all your symptoms, so you can get the right help.

Treatment for bone damage

Sometimes myeloma can cause damage to vertebrae, which are the bones making up your spine. You will have already been given bisphosphonate drugs to reduce the pain and increase the strength of your bones. You might also need an operation to repair the damaged bones to prevent the condition getting worse. If you need this operation you’ll be looked after by an orthopaedic surgeon, who’ll explain to you what’s involved.

Follow-up

Your follow-up will depend on what type of treatment (if any) you’re having, and how your condition has responded. If your illness has responded well, it may be some time before you need any further treatment.

Your consultant will explain how often you’ll come back for follow-up checks. These appointments are very important so do make sure you get to them.

Edward's story

How I built up my fitness after treatment for myeloma

Edward's story

We're here for you if you want to talk

0808 2080 888

[email protected]