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Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) prognosis

We're here for you if you want to talk

0808 2080 888

[email protected]

After you’ve been diagnosed AML, you may want to know more about your prognosis - what's likely to happen in the future.

Each patient with AML will have a different prognosis, which will depend on a range of factors. These include your age and medical fitness, whether your disease is low or high risk, and whether the cancer is primary or secondary.

Patients in the low risk group who are treated without a stem cell transplant have about a 70–90% chance of long-term survival (surviving at least five years after remission). People in the high risk group tend to have a poorer prognosis, although some do particularly well with a stem cell transplant.

For people who aren’t medically able to have intensive treatment, the goal is not to achieve a cure, but to improve the length and quality of life.

AML that's developed because of previous treatment for another cancer are usually more difficult to treat with standard chemotherapy. This is also the case for people with other forms of secondary AML. This means they have a poorer overall prognosis compared with primary AML, which is why stem cell transplants are usually considered as a treatment option.

Ask your healthcare team about your prognosis

We have general information about things that might affect your prognosis, but everyone is different. If you want to know about your individual prognosis, your healthcare team are the best people to ask. They know you and your individual situation.

Dawn, support line worker

Worried or have questions about prognosis?

We can talk you through it

Support for you

We're here for you if you want to talk

0808 2080 888

[email protected]